Ford B-Max Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Thanks Paul, just my era, are you an ex airman ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Greetings Jack,

No i am not an ex airman but could have been i guess.
Born in 1955 well after WW2 this war has always had my special attention,much to the surprise of my father (1934,passed away last July) who witnessed the bombing of Rotterdam in 1940.
My mother came from Arnhem and was evacuated during the battle in September 1944.
The mother of my father,the grandmother i never knew,died of starvation in april 1945.
Possibly all this caused my special interest in WW2,who knows.
In particular the efforts by the USAAF 8th airforce have my special attention,i think their massive sacrifice has been underrated many times.
Currently,i am awaiting arrival from the UK of the Corgi Toys 1/144 scale A bit o' lace b-17,one of the most famous B-17s.
Airfix have released a superb 1/72 kit of the B-17 with full interior,must have that one too.
Did you know that B-17s flew back and forth to Russia?
Please see following clip:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A8HBB0_O-8
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Thanks Paul, I thought I knew nearly everything about WW2, but I did not know about this operating out of Russia by the Americans, I will post it on RAF sites I am a member of, it lasts 37 minutes a bit long for anyone not obsessed by WW2 like me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jack,

We are now living about 72 years after the ending of WW2 and still new facts emerge.
Main events have drawn most attention,smaller events have submerged in the mist of time.
But the locals remember,everywhere and always.


On about each and every major railwaystation in Holland you will find a bronze plaque with names of railwaymen fallen in WW2,most of them because of allied strafing,a fact often forgotten.
Enginedrivers were forced to work for occupying forces and were killed because of allied action.
The father of my mother was an enginedriver,i never knew him.


During the German invasion of Holland in May 1940 over 2,000 Dutch soldiers were killed in action,many refused to surrender on the forth day,when Rotterdam was bomded to force surrender.
British press usually refers to this as "Defeat in the low countries".
Many Ju-52 planes were shot down which may have caused Hitler to think twice about invading England with paratrooper forces.


The USAAF bomded Nijmegen by mistake,intention was to bomb Kleve just over the border.
The USAAF also bomded The Hague by mistake,in an attempt to destroy V-2 sites.
This we call the price of freedom i believe.


Earlier this week it was 75 years ago that German forces were defeated at Stalingrad,the turningpoint in WW2,something we should ever be grateful for,and i am not a communist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Jack,

I sent you a private message on the forum.


Cheers,


Paul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes,we are well aware of that,especially around Rotterdam.Believe the British called it Operation Manna and the USAAF called it Operation Chow Hound.
My late father who was a boy in the war still recalled the tins filled with biscuits dropped from the air.
It came too late for his mother,who died of starvation in April 1945.
The whole problem was caused by the Dutch government in exile.
Following the liberation of Antwerp it was believed that Holland would be liberated in a matter of days.
As such,a general railwaystrike was declared in London.
The Germans took revange by stopping all food supplies to the west of Holland.
A long cold winter followed.
People in Rotterdam cut all trees and burned railway sleepers to stay warm.
Food was very scarce,cats and dogs were eaten,people were dying on the streets.
We will remember,always.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top