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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
''Its a heavy car MiVO for a one litre engine !!! Even my 1.6 diesel
struggles a bit on overtaking in 3 rd gear; I guess like most modern 5
or 6 gear cars 4 th is probably the most responsive
,'' @John Wales said. But I am very satisfied with the accelleration in all gears. And I have read no complaints about that on Dutch car review sites either.
I am by no means a technical man, but I have a feeling that my 1 liter 120 hp engine has to work very hard, with thanks to the turbo, to perform so well. To be able to cope, it perhaps inevitably uses a bit more fuel. Which some buyers didn't anticipate, explaining the complaints on that fuel issue about the B Max.
PS Our earlier postings were the subject of Start/Stop.
 

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Hi MiVO,

Have to agree with you there. I purchased the car on the basis of power/fuel consumption but I am a little disappointed.

Love everything about it but Max MPG up to now only 47 and around town as low as 32.

1.0 ecoboost 120bhp with5500 miles on clock.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello Specialk. Must say, that's a comforting thought, thanks

Fortunately I have enough spare time the coming days to try and convert miles per gallon to kilometers per liter
 

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Hello I recently changed from a diesel Fiesta 54mpg to a petrol 1.6 Auto B.Max and was a bit worried about the consumption. But surprisingly Im getting 43Mpg just local shopping runs.Even flooring it and hard driving its doing 40.Have not tried much motorway work yet.
 

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I have a 1.6 Diesel B-Max, they advertise it at 70mpg, yea...I get around 42 mpg, even on motorways, which I feel is rubbish.

Maybe the B in B-Max stands for Bullsh*te
 

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I cannot understand your problem Andybear 47; I have written countless pages on my own personal fuel consumption figures on my 1.6 diesel. I am constantly achieving 60 m.p.g. plus on all forms of driving. My style eliminates the use of Cruise Control to build up your speed to the set figure - I manually increase my speed gradually and then activate it; I inflate tyres ( winter ) to 36 psi, and I avoid exceeding 2000 r.p.m. which should enable you to drive at 66 m.p.h. I acknowledge that if you should drive at 80 m.p.h. there is going to be a dramatic increase in consumption.

Do the obvious checks to make sure your brakes are not binding, and set your instant consumption data on, to get an idea of what figure is being recorded at any one time. Report back; your consumption reflects a petrol engine not diesel.
 

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Johnwales
Note your comments about mpg and I am begining to think their might be something wrong with my 1.6 diesel. I have had it for 5 months and done 7000 miles. This involves a daily 32 mile round trip commute, mainy dual carriagewayand a lot of visits to Wales and back, mainly dual carriageway, quiet A roads. I like to think I drive economically and get 5 'leafs' on the ecomode setting. My driving style sounds similar to the way you explain in your post, yet I have failed to get more than 56 mpg average out of any tank at any time. The worst in the winter was 49.9. I will try putting a few pounds more in the tyres to see it if makes a difference, otherwise might go back to Ford.(Not sure if they will be any great help in this area, but at least it can be checked out).
 

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Hi Maggie, you mean 60 m.p.G. of course; I think you should be able to improve even on that. Perhaps you are a 'girl racer and have a tendency to race through the gears. If that is the case there is no doubt your engine will be the better for it, modern engines prefer to be stretched.




ANDYSWAD, I would feel a little concerned if I was producing your figures. Let me say however, the majority of my journeys are with just me in the car; I find that when I have passengers and a good load of luggage consumption does increase, but not to the extent of 49.6. An interesting test is to put your computer to instant consumption, the field which tells you are getting 99.9 m.p.g. when going down hill in neutral. It is quite alarming to see the read outs being produced when the engine is cold, and even when accelerating up a slight incline. I have had cars that respond to hard work far more favourably. I have a few more tips to try and get better figures - Use the road ahead to optimise economy, take advantage of downhill slopes to build up speed to tackle the next hill. Minimise use of the foot brake, try and glide to a halt at junctions. If you do not have ISG turn the engine off at road worksand traffic jams where you have a good view ahead. You mention the tyres, this can in fact reduce consumption by up to 7.5 %. Your car has done about 1,000 more miles than mine, and is a month or so older, so you should be getting better figures. Check your brakes for any binding, and perhaps do a manual fuel check in case your computer is dodgy. I presume you know the method for doing that, if you don't get back to me. As you have said, I do not think Ford will be very interested in consumption figures, they will say no two cars are the same.

There is one final check I often do on cars. When the engine is warm, drive it to an area where there are no upward hills, reset the consumption programme and drive as economically as you possibly can. Just note how high you can get the reading. Coming down a local mountain road I have managed to hit 89 m.p.g., and on a genuine flat road have achieved 67.8 m.p.g. in the B Max. This does prove that the car is capable of returning good economy if the conditions are perfect.

Good luck
 

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Hi,

I just joined the forum over this thread re:fuel consumption issues.

Be aware, there are very big differences between diesel fuels. Just getting a B Max (1.0 100hp Zetec) from a 1.6 diesel Fusion + (basically the same engine in the B Max).

Running around local with the Fusion +, on Shell V-power (I think that's what it is called, the top one anyway), and was getting just over 65 mpg (65.4mpg average).

Morrisons Supermarket diesel - 42 - 43 mpg driving the same way.

Tesco Supermarket diesel - 42 - 43 mpg ditto.

Shell 'standard' diesel - 56 - 57 mpg ditto.

Murco diesel- 56 - 57mpg ditto.

This may reflect the amount of 'bio' in different diesels, like I have found on the Continent with ethanol in different petrols.

For perspective, E85 petrol (15% ethanol) hammers fuel consumption by about 30% (this is completely in line with the lack of energy in the petrol, compared to straight unleaded, and as a rough rule of thumb you can say whatever percentage of ethanol is in the petrol - obviously liable to change at ends of spectrum - you will lose twice that in fuel consumption so 10% ethanol, you lose about 20%, so if straight unleaded you get 50 mpg, with 10% ethanol you get 40mpg).

I had a huge shock with a very efficient motorbike on a run down to Spain a few years back, and used French 95 octane for the first time (with what turned out to be an unknown amount of ethanol in it), and instead of reserve light after a fill up coming on at about the 195 mile mark (usual touring economy), it went to 120 - 125 miles. It was the same for all the others with different motorbikes in the touring group.

We got our usual touring consumption back by paying the premium for 97 octane (which worked out massively cheaper despite quite a heavy per litre premium).

So I suppose the message is, don't be too quick to blame the vehicles, there is appalling junk coming out of fuel pumps these days. If less mileage than you expect, definitely try different fuels.
 

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I must add, if you have a diesel, the worst thing you can do with it is stop/start or switch off for short stops. Particularly so if you have a turbo (and if you have a turbo on a petrol engine, the same applies).

Diesel's on tickover hardly use any fuel (it is why heaters traditionally go cold when stuck in traffic, they are using so little energy they can't even keep the heaters warm), plus, stopping and starting the engine has a big effect on wear and tear.

If you have a turbo, let it tickover for at least 30 seconds before switching off, to make sure that a fast revving turbine has enough oil feed while those revs slow down (otherwise rapidly blown seals and bearings will result, and aturboplus replacementis not cheap). The same when starting off, let it tickover for at least 30 seconds before touching the throttle, to make sure oil feed is getting to those important bearings.

The idiots promoting this stop/start nonsense don't appear to have the slightest concept of proper mechanical management (thankfully you can disconnect stop/start), or engineering realities.




I have driven turbocharged vehicles for several million miles, and have never had a turbo blow up on me, just by treating them properly. Clean oil and filters, regularly changed, and with a lorry, not turning off the engine unless stopping for say 20+ minutes, improved efficiency, reliability, component service life, and dramatically improved fuel efficiency (warm engine tolerances are important).
 

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My 1.6 Diesel B - Max spent 3 weeks in the garage over the Christmas period, as there was a problem with a loss ofpower whilst driving, even though the problem was rectified fuel consumption is still poor, at around 42 mpg, I have been in contact with Ford, and they keep telling me to have it checked, but the garage can not find a problem, the fact that the display shows 3 green stars, which shows I am driving with care, plus I always maintain low revs,I also fill up at a BP garage with Ultimate Diesel, not the supermarket stuff, so really can't understand why consumption is as low as it is.

I have been a HGV driver for over 40 years driving diesel vehicles, so feel I have a good knowledge of diesel engines, but feel I have a duff one in my B - Max
 

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Thanks Ribbit for your reference to idiots. ISG is fitted to many eco diesel cars, and I have often wondered about the effects on the turbo. The recommendation about turning the engine off refers to high speed motoring, and there is little evidence of likely damage where the engine has not been pushed. However, I agree it is advisable to let the engine idle for 30 seconds or so before feathering it, and would only suggest it where you are likely to remain idle for more than 2 minutes. I am dead against ISG as a standing fixture, because of the continuous stop / start sequence that occurs, which also causes a drain on the battery.

I have never had a diesel car that blows cold air when idling, in fact I find modern diesel cars heat up to comfort level very quickly.
 

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I have a1.6 diesel and the best i get is 47 with inflated tyres at 36 psi and doing no more than 70

What anybody tells you the fuel consumption that ford talk about 60.1 urban and 70.6 combined is just not achievable.

The only thing I can say is that all car manufactures make figures that suit the sales brochure.

If I was the only one to get 47 to the gallon i would think there maybe something wrong with the brakes or the car itself but i think its just the way the car is designed. going down a motorway for 22 miles i got 65.1 coming back up the other way I got 48. To me that means the wind plays a key factor.
Even withe wind i didn't get 78 like advertised

It's time car manufacture's put realistic figures in their brochure's

But i'm still happy with the car I was getting 26 from my 2 ltr petrol auto mondeo
 

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I was informed that Fords consumption figureswere achievedby their technical department, no doubt in a room on rollers, with no wind resistance, which should not be allowed.

In my opinion all fuel test should be carried out under normal every day driving, on a variety of roads, to ensure customers get a true picture of the capabilities of that vehicle.

My best fuel consumption was achieved last week, on a 250 mile round trip to Bournemouth last week, were I managed 48 to the gallon, on what was on over 90% motorway and duel carriageway, at a speed between 60 and 70 mph (MPG as on the on board computer), with no hold ups.

My vehicle had a service a week prior to my journey, so would have expected more.

I must admit I do like my B-Max, just a pity I have had to endure a few problems with it.
 

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1.6 diesel, in Denmark, fairly cold outside still so running with a little heat on. And headlights + radio. On a 100 mile trip this weekend I got 47.8 mpg (5.9 L/100 km)

I think last autumn when it was warm outside, I managed to go just below 5 L/100, around 56.
The 25km/L advertised to us on buying (70 mpg) is absolutely nonsense as I see it.
 

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Been checking the forum regarding tips for better fuel consumption. Put 3 psi more in each of my tyres and have been using Shell V Max diesel for the last 2 tankfuls. Consumption has increased from an average of around 54-55 to 60-61. OK V Max is more expensive (about 7% dearer) but mpg has increased by about 10%. You do the sums.....
 

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Did a 340 mile journey from France today, driving at 80 m.p.h. in France ( 40 miles ) and at 70 m.p.h. on motorways in U.K. and then fast rural road driving to complete the journey. Average consumption, having zeroed the meter at the start of the journey was 66.9 m.p.g. Also did a manual check by filling the tank to absolute limit at completion of journey and figure of 66.6 m.p.g.
 

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Was talking to a mechanic last week, when getting a new rear tyre for the motorbike, he'd had a good look at the B-Max I brought the rear wheel in (first one he'd seen, and he liked it), and I mentioned getting a diesel version next. He said "Watch these modern diesels with those Diesel Particulate Filters, you have to give them a good blast fairly regularly to prevent them from clogging up" and his idea of a 'good blast' was a half hour or so at motorway speeds.

I wonder what effect they have on fuel consumptionwhen they start to get a bit 'icky'? Another point I suppose, is how fast do they start to get a bit icky at urban driving speeds?

Mine (100hp 1,000cc petrol) has now done just over 1,000 miles, and the worst I have managed, doing some 'variable heavy right foot work' to aid running in (changing gear close to 6,000 rpm), has been 34.7 mpg on the consumption computer.Average seems to be around 42 - 44, and is improving as the miles go on. Moving briskly it seems quite hard work to get it below 40mpg now (even with the a/c on, it seems to like hovering around 41.1). Had a nice run to Somerset over Easter, and the engine pulled well with three heavy adults on board.
I'd love this engine in a motorbike. I'm more than a bit impressed.
 

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Your mechanic friend Ribbit is being a little pessimistic. The DPF does not clog up unless you constantly do short journeys of less than 5 miles. I experienced the problem a few years ago on a Seat Ibiza eco model which I used as a run about. After about 2 months the warning light came on and I booked the car into the dealer in Wolverhampton who supplied the vehicle to have it sorted. A few days later I set out to honour the appointment, but after about 8 miles the light went out, and I never saw it again.
My Bmax has done 8000 miles plus now, and although I regularly drive on the motorway system both in the U.K. and abroad, I can often drive for 3 or 4 weeks on journeys of less than one mile. Even journeys of a longer nature in this part of Wales could see me restricted to 45 m.p.h., which could make the D P F vulnerable to clogging, but it has not happened on the B Max.

Having read your post I will probably give the car a blast every now and again, but I stress it is not necessary to drive at motorway speeds to achieve this. Just drop down to second or third gear and give it a mile or so at 3000 r.p.m., that should clear the filter and boost the battery.
 
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