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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any idea how the auto headlights decide whether it's light or day ?. Mine seem to have a mind of their own. Early morning and it's sunny and the headlights come on. Afternoon drivehome, with cloud cover and it's side lights only. Is it a bit more complicated than a light sensor ? More importantly is it adjustable (I'm guessing probably not !!)
If someone in the know has the info I'd be grateful....

Titanium X 1.6 TDCi (Silver)
 

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I have the perfect solution. Turn them off at the master control !!!! Any one who cannot detect when it is time to turn the lights on does not deserve a driving licence. All sorts of influences will activate the lights, driving through a clump of trees for example. I have been followed by cars before now where the light sensor has operated with such intensity I truly believed they were trying to warn me one of my wheels had dropped off !!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Johnwales - Stangely enough I had considered that option having been in possession of a driving licence for 35 years, and I now rarely, if everuse the auto headlight function. My question was really to ascertain Fords thinking when they install these 'gadgets' and to understand how the system actually works.
As I stated, if anyone has the info, I would be interested...
 

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Not sure I know exactly but it must rely on light sensors. Light sensors being variable in each batch would give a variation in the sensitive point. In the control system there will be a tolerance on the the on and off points which would add to the uncertainty of when to be on or off.

I would think Ford err on the 'better to be on than off' which could account for lights being on when you think they could be off.


Have they every been off when you think they should be on? Ignore transient shade such as passing under trees when the system would have a built in delay before turning the lights on.


When the car is fitted with bright LED lights it is very easy to drive off without rear or headlights. In fact the manual warns of this. I was stopped at night by Police who asked if I knew why I was stopped. I had driven 4 miles without rear or headlights because the LED lights showed on my drive when leaving and I was engaged in conversation. I had overlooked that I had turned the lights to manual.


I totally ignore the auto setting now and have got used to it.



I doubt you will get an engineer/designer answer to your question. I would think for reasons of safety, not adjustable.

Edited by: makem
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Think you are probably right referring to Ford erring on the side of caution.
I have not had an experience when I thought the lights should have been on when htey weren't.

As you said, it's easy to get caughtout at twilight times as if the lights are left on the normal setting with the sidelights on, the dashboard is lit up thereby giving you the impression that your lights are on.
 

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Ford apparently fit the sensor at the front in the housing for the rear view mirror. This fits in with my own observationof the auto headlights going on and off dependent on my driving direction in the early morning or late evening.
I tend to leave the switch in auto anyway as the daytime running lights are good enough in
most circumstances.
 

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Do mean 'not in auto' rather than 'in auto'?

In auto it may turn on the headlight in not what you consider not dark enough and as you say, the LED lights are good enough anyway.
 
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